GREIL MARCUS THE OLD WEIRD AMERICA PDF

Share via Email Greil Marcus … his work builds a bridge between music journalism and academia. Marcus was at the forefront of the first generation of rock critics, the babyboomers who invented the genre from scratch around , but none of his peers can rival his imposing body of work , which comprises four major books Mystery Train, Lipstick Traces, Invisible Republic, The Shape of Things to Come , several focused studies such as his recent scintillating monograph on the Doors , and five themed collections of essays and reviews. We sit in his basement study, watched by a life-size cut-out of Buddy Holly. And it was at the University of California in Berkeley that three formative experiences occurred that have steered his course ever since. It was back, it was here to stay, it was something that would grow with you all through your life. Pauline started the Cinema Guild, a Berkeley arthouse movie theatre, and did the programme notes for hundreds of foreign and Hollywood movies.

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How could you so masterfully suck all of the life and enjoyment out of such profoundly freewheeling and spirited recordings? And what did Dock Boggs and Geeshie Wiley ever do to deserve such pretentious dribble from your pen?

Sep 05, Ben rated it really liked it I first read this book about two years ago, and this is what I wrote then: It was certainly very informative and Marcus made an interesting case about how Dylan and the Band drew on the old, weird America of the past Kill Devil Hills, Smithville in the summer of , when they recorded the famed Basement Tape Recordings.

The discography is, I first read this book about two years ago, and this is what I wrote then: It was certainly very informative and Marcus made an interesting case about how Dylan and the Band drew on the old, weird America of the past Kill Devil Hills, Smithville in the summer of , when they recorded the famed Basement Tape Recordings.

The discography is, perhaps, more interesting than the prose. Over the past couple of years much of the book had been forgotten, but some tiny details stuck with me, for they resonated with me for some reason or another. It was all a goof. But what started in the basement, what came out of it.

Killing time. Beginning with the release of Great White Wonder in , the record that is often credited as the beginning of the bootleg industry in music, the basement tapes soon were being sold on the streets. Great White Wonder was quickly followed by many other vinyl pressings with a variety of interesting titles. And in the s and early s several CD sets were released, claiming to offer all or most of the material from these famed sessions, among them The Genuine Basement Tapes and A Tree With Roots.

In Columbia released a 2LP set titled simply The Basement Tapes, which included on it 16 basement recordings, plus 8 demos by the Band. Having searched for bootleg copies of these recordings — with no success — for many years, I was ecstatic when I heard about this release and I had anticipated it for months before it actually hit store shelves. That was on November 4th. I listened to all of the tracks twice through.

Most of them were unfamiliar to me — I knew they were out there somewhere, but I had never heard them though I searched for them determinedly — and others I had heard countless times before those that had been officially-released here and there over the years.

They can begin to sound like an experiment, or a laboratory. Often times I would encounter a song and find a lyric that Dylan lifted for one of his songs, something he has been doing throughout his career, just as many in the folk tradition have done for centuries before him.

Countless writers and musicians have lifted lines or melodies from others, and it is part of not only the folk tradition, but many literary traditions as well Ferlinghetti remarks on this somewhere; so does TS Eliot. Marcus in this book gives us a blueprint for discovering some of these recordings and if we follow the paths he lays out in this book, without deviation, we find that the roads actually go much deeper in some cases, into forbidden forests and up winding mountain roads.

I tried to stick only to the roads Marcus shows us in his map, but—despite warning signs — I found myself sometimes sneaking down hidden alleys, building bridges, turning around at various roundabouts and dead-ends and sometimes finding that certain roads were much longer than I had at first anticipated. It draws you in and shows you all sorts of interesting things about not only the music, but about yourself and about the collective American experience if the reader is an American.

In some tracks on the basement tapes we really do just hear guys goofing off, having fun, killing time. But on other tracks we find hints of betrayal, seduction, lust, deception, warning, desperation, that are part of the collective American experience, going back to the beginnings and running through the present and beyond.

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What Came Out of the Basement: 'The Old Weird America'

Amazon In , America seemed done, finished. The assassination of a young president in had closed the New Frontier and unleashed ill-spirits into the land. Martin Luther King died in Memphis, the city of mystery trains and records that shone like the Sun. The city at the tip of the Delta where so much of America had been born over the last few decades suddenly became a city of the dead, a place where someone shot a king just to watch him die.

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What Came Out of the Basement: 'The Old Weird America'

How could you so masterfully suck all of the life and enjoyment out of such profoundly freewheeling and spirited recordings? And what did Dock Boggs and Geeshie Wiley ever do to deserve such pretentious dribble from your pen? Sep 05, Ben rated it really liked it I first read this book about two years ago, and this is what I wrote then: It was certainly very informative and Marcus made an interesting case about how Dylan and the Band drew on the old, weird America of the past Kill Devil Hills, Smithville in the summer of , when they recorded the famed Basement Tape Recordings. The discography is, I first read this book about two years ago, and this is what I wrote then: It was certainly very informative and Marcus made an interesting case about how Dylan and the Band drew on the old, weird America of the past Kill Devil Hills, Smithville in the summer of , when they recorded the famed Basement Tape Recordings. The discography is, perhaps, more interesting than the prose. Over the past couple of years much of the book had been forgotten, but some tiny details stuck with me, for they resonated with me for some reason or another. It was all a goof.

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